Movers, Shakers, Leadership Makers

Relevant Resources for Leaders, Innovators, and Thinkers

Mindset Monday! — May 16, 2016

Mindset Monday!

Let’s go hard today! It’s Mindset Monday. Everything we do originates in our thought life first. Reserve the to reject negativity. Plan your progress for the week and stick to your plan so you can see the results. We are almost 6 months into 2016. Ask yourself: “What needs to GROW and what needs to GO?” Create a great week. Who’s with me?

Enna B

How Faith in the Workplace Increases ROI — February 26, 2014
Developing an Innovative Culture —
THE RED ZONE OF PUBLIC SPEAKING — January 30, 2014
30 Seconds on Leadership – Jump Start Your Teams for 2014 — December 30, 2013
What Leadership is…. — December 19, 2013
The Grinch (Leader) who Stole Christmas (Progress) — December 12, 2013

The Grinch (Leader) who Stole Christmas (Progress)

The title of this epic tale actually betrays the happy ending.  The 30-second snapshot is that we as leaders have the power and the duty to overcome our pride and prejudices. Lets do as much good as we possibly can.  It is always the right time to do the right thing.  Do a 180…go in a more productive/positive direction.  When we come to ourselves and realize the error of our ways its time to make what we can right.  We have a lot to learn from the Grinch!

RIDING THE WORK/LIFE SEE SAW — December 5, 2013
TO BUY OR NOT BUY (GIFTS FOR STAFF)…THAT IS THE QUESTION — December 2, 2013

TO BUY OR NOT BUY (GIFTS FOR STAFF)…THAT IS THE QUESTION

The holiday season is here.  This can often be an awkward time in the office for those in positions of leadership.  Although traditionally viewed as the “politically correct” thing to do, is gift giving required/expected in the workplace?  Should leaders/managers make it a point to acknowledge team members and subordinates in a tangible/meaningful way during this particular day?  After all, you have Bosses Day, Administrative Professionals Day…but where is frontline worker day?

There is no right or wrong answer to this question.  In this age of varying religious preferences one could even offend by giving gifts and so you just have to be careful.  Consider these suggestions:

1.  Celebrate or acknowledge employees at a different time of the year.  Christmas is so busy and so packed on the personal side take the pressure off in December.  Consider a “Christmas in July” or something more creative in the spring.  Don’t lock yourself in to a date on a calendar.  Establish a tradition you can live with.

2.  Do it cheerfully or don’t do it at all.  Employees can smell the stench of insincerity like cheap cologne on a crowded elevator. If you aren’t a “gift giver” its okay to say that.  At least then people know what to expect or not expect.  Those who are appreciative and find ways to acknowledge others throughout the year need not be overly concerned with the holiday season.

3.  What does the company culture, past practice dictate in the arena of gift giving?  If this area is a “sacred cow” its best to understand what the expectations are and govern yourself accordingly.  This will help you decide how to approach gift giving.

4.  Keep it manageable.  Do something you can maintain.  Don’t go from Corvettes one year to Chevettes the next.  Simple, thoughtful, and useful are good rules of thumb.  Most people just appreciate being thought about so short of a HUGE increase in their paychecks what you give is really more of sentimental value.

ENNA A. BACHELOR

ENNA ON LEADERSHIP….BOUNCING BACK — November 26, 2013

ENNA ON LEADERSHIP….BOUNCING BACK

Leaders must perfect the art of bouncing back. There are places and spaces where we get side tracked or sidelined and how we “come back” will determine how effective we can be going forward.  Our past accomplishments and accolades can only carry  so far into the future.  Being effective in the right now doesn’t allow you to rest on the laurels of days gone by.  Whatever knocked you out, prepare yourself for great comeback!  Here are 5 tips to help you bounce back with a vengenance:

1.  Acknowledge/appreciate/commend those who held down the fort while you were out of commission.  Have them give you a comprehensive update.  PAY ATTENTION to their observations of the team and the work that has transpired in your absence. 

2.  Rally the troops.  Bring the team back together establish/restablish your baseline expectations and goals.

3.  Be patient. The troops may have grown accumstomed to the leadership style and expectations of someone else.  It may take a little time to readjust (for everyone.)

4.  Communicate.  Many times when we’ve been out of commission for an extended period of time and we quickly develop tunnel vision.  We want to dive back in and start producing.  While productivity is important, communication is key.  Stay connected.  Be responsive and initiate dialogue that will allow you to have an accurate view of the current status. 

5.  Strive to be constructive rather than critical.  Its very easy, if we are not careful, to fall into criticizing what was done in our absence.  Please do not take this bait.  Make the best of what happened or what didn’t and move forward.  You are now in a position to affect positive and productive outcomes.  Don’t waist time complaining about what cannot be changed.  This doesn’t mean turn a blind eye to gross negligence or incompetence.  But, to the furthest extent possible, focus forward and plan a success stragtegy that can build on the work accomplished in your absence without tearing down others.

ENNA B.

Its been a minute since I posted an original post.  Lots going on in my world and most of it good.  With this post I will return to more regular and original posts on a weekly basis.  Trying to manage my time and my priorities more responsibly.